The Street of Broken Dreams

The Boulevard of Broken Dreams–Green Day
I walk a lonely road
The only one that I have ever known
Don’t know where it goes
But it’s only me, and I walk alone
I walk this empty street
On the boulevard of broken dreams
Where the city sleeps
And I’m the only one, and I walk alone
I walk alone, I walk alone
I walk alone and I walk a
My shadow’s the only one that walks beside me
My shallow heart’s the only thing that’s beating
Sometimes I wish someone out there will find me
Till then I walk alone
Ah ah ah ah ah
Ah ah ah ah ah
I’m walking down the line
That divides me somewhere in my mind
On the border line of the edge
And where I walk alone
Read between the lines
What’s fucked up and every thing’s all right
Check my vital signs to know I’m still alive
And I walk alone
I walk alone, I walk alone
I walk alone and I walk a
My shadow’s the only one that walks beside me
My shallow heart’s the only thing that’s beating
Sometimes I wish someone out there will find me
Till then I walk alone
Ah ah ah ah ah
Ah ah ah ah ah
I walk alone, I walk a
I walk this empty street
On the boulevard of broken dreams
Where the city sleeps
And I’m the only one, and I walk alone
My shadow’s the only one that walks beside me
My shallow heart’s the only thing that’s beating
Sometimes I wish someone out there will find me
Till then I walk alone

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Last night I came home from visiting a friend in Marin around 3:30 a.m. As I walked towards home from parking the car people started coming from no-where. They simply wanted to talk, and be heard.  On the “street of broken dreams”, there is no one, people are alone, they are fragmented, afraid, and simply feel life has no meaning. Walk these streets after the bars are closed, on Thanksgiving and Christmas, and on rainy nights, and you will feel the pain of the “street of broken dreams.”

A recent study concluded that there were three reasons that people lived into old age in a healthy manner, all three having to do nothing with food, diet, or  exercise.  Two were having people you can hang out with, have fun with, and who will loan you money if you need it, the top was chatting with people in daily life, and the third:

“Having people to sit with you in the existential moments of life.” To have some one with you at those times when the veil is thin between life and death, between total loneliness, and ,  when life seems to have no meaning, and you seem worthless. In the past few months I have had people with me on my journey with this surgery, they gave me hope, meaning, and when people seemed to walk a way they stood with me. One of them says to me when I thank him, “No problem”, and he has no idea how he was there when the world seemed to walk out. I remember the look in his eyes as he visited me when three days after the surgery, and I was in so much pain–a look of care, of love, that still haunts me in its realness.  What we do always has meaning–whether we know it or not.

One of our mayoral candidates talks of “having tough love” with the homeless. I believe that if we walk with people in their “existential moments” that individuals can see life has meaning, and that in being held in love,despite  themselves, we see our worthiness, and from that lives are transformed. When I was a whore on the streets of LA, at my lowest point, my friend River reminded me each day that I was worthy, how much I helped him, and what I had to offer by going back into ministry.  He stood with me in my “existential moments of life,” and my friends these past months have done the same thing.

Homelessness is not going away–but what each one of us can do is to walk out of our doors and show care by listening to people in their “existential moments”,  move out of ourselves, move away from social media, and touch the lives of people, not just one time , but each and every day, and change will come in them, but more importantly in you. Find one person, and become his or her friend in the “existential moments!”  Deo Gratias! Thanks be to God!

Fr. River Damien Sims, D.Min.

P.O. Box 642656

San Francisco, CA 94164

415-305-2124

www.temenos.org

Temenos Catholic Worker

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